MERCADO DE ATARAZANAS DE MÁLAGA

NEWS

The current Mercado de Atarazanas de Málaga owes its name to the old shipyards built during the time of the Nasrid dynasty (13th-15th centuries). Thanks to the archaeological findings around the area, it is estimated that it could have been erected towards the end of the 13th century or the beginning of the 14th, the first references date back to the year 1404 (Ordiérez Díez), when the testimony of Al-Umari Ibn Al-Jatib was It refers to the “House of the Nazarí fleet”, highlighting in this way that the Malaga shipyards officially displaced the Almería (Arancibia) shipyard. As its name indicates, it was the building where boats used for maritime trade throughout the Mediterranean arc were built and repaired, which coincides with a time of great economic splendor, thanks to the fertility of its lands and the trade derived from its most precious products: figs, vines and oils, as well as its outstanding ceramic and tannery industries.

MERCADO DE ATARAZANAS DE MÁLAGA

The current Mercado de Atarazanas de Málaga owes its name to the old shipyards built during the time of the Nasrid dynasty (13th-15th centuries). Thanks to the archaeological findings around the area, it is estimated that it could have been erected towards the end of the 13th century or the beginning of the 14th, the first references date back to the year 1404 (Ordiérez Díez), when the testimony of Al-Umari Ibn Al-Jatib was It refers to the “House of the Nazarí fleet”, highlighting in this way that the Malaga shipyards officially displaced the Almería (Arancibia) shipyard. As its name indicates, it was the building where boats used for maritime trade throughout the Mediterranean arc were built and repaired, which coincides with a time of great economic splendor, thanks to the fertility of its lands and the trade derived from its most precious products: figs, vines and oils, as well as its outstanding ceramic and tannery industries.

El Mercado Central de Atarazanas is the indoor food market in the centre of Málaga, selling fresh local produce. The building is impressive, with a huge stained-glass window at one end, but of equal artistic merit are the displays of seasonal fruit and veg. We watched the fishmongers at work on the latest catch and were tempted by the charcutería and olive stalls. There are a couple of bars inside, opening out on to the street but we retired to an old sherry bar, only a five-minute walk away, to toast our purchases.

A REVIEW OF HERITAGE BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING (H-BIM)

Many projects concerning the protection, conservation, restoration, and dissemination of cultural heritage are being carried out around the world due to its growing interest as a driving force of socio-economic development. The existence of reliable, digital three-dimensional (3D) models that allow for the planning and management of these projects in a remote and decentralized way is currently a growing necessity. There are many software tools to perform the modeling and complete three-dimensional documentation of the intervened monuments. However, the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) sector has adopted the Building Information Modeling (BIM) standard over the last few decades due to the progress that has been made in its qualities and capabilities. The complex modeling of cultural heritage through commercial BIM software leads to the consideration of the concept of Heritage BIM (H-BIM), which pursues the modeling of architectural elements, according to artistic, historical, and constructive typologies. In addition, H-BIM is considered to be an emerging technology that enables us to understand, document, advertize, and virtually reconstruct the built heritage. This article is a review of the existing literature on H-BIM and its effective implementation in the cultural heritage sector, exploring the effectiveness and the usefulness of the different methodologies that were developed to model families of elements of interest.

 ATARAZANAS DIGITAL WAS BORN

Marco Polo describes a bridge, stone by stone.

- But what is the stone that supports the bridge? - Kublai Khan asks.

- The bridge is not supported by this stone or by that one - Marco answers - but by the line of the arch that they form.

Kublai remains silent, reflecting. Then add:

- Why are you telling me about the stones? The only thing that matters to me is the bow.

Polo responds:

- Without stones there is no arch.

The invisible cities

Ítalo Calvino

BIM FOR HERITAGE - DEVELOPING THE ASSET INFORMATION MODEL

Historic England began to consider Building Information Modelling (BIM) in 2013 and published their first guidance document BIM for Heritage – Developing a historic building information model in 2018. BIM application in the heritage sector to date has had a heavy focus on digital documentation of heritage assets however, for the benefits of BIM as an information management process to be achieved, simple and relevant guidance is required.

This new guidance is the second in a series of documents on BIM for heritage and focuses on heritage asset management, in particular conservation repair and maintenance, and suggests that the first task when adopting a BIM information management approach is to develop an Asset Information Model (AIM).

It is for owners, heritage trusts and others involved in the conservation repair and maintenance of heritage assets. It gives an overview of the BIM for heritage journey, heritage asset management and the BIM information management process. It will help owners and organisations consider how BIM approaches may be used in the planning and delivery of conservation repair and maintenance and provides guidance in developing a heritage focused asset information model and the required suite of documents to assist those wishing to adopt BIM information management workflows in a heritage context.

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